Landmarks, Art & Architecture Unit-Week 1

For our last Unit of this year, my oldest requested to study Famous Buildings, Landmarks and Architecture. I loved the idea and got busy right away requesting a bunch of Library books!

Book List:

Architecture A Visual History by James Neal

Joan Steiner Look-A-likes:  Discover a Land where things are not as they appear… and Around the World ; An Album of Amazing Postcards

Monumental Versus by J. Patrick Lewis (poetry)

13 Buildings Children Should Know by Anette Roeder

Buildings in Disguise by Joan Marie Arbogast

Pop’s Bridge by Eve Bunting

Using both these books and worksheets found on Education.com in a “Let’s Travel” series we set out to visit the Landmarks!

                                                   First Stop: England!

We viewed and became familiar with Westminster Abbey, Stonehenge, Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Tower of London and Big Ben.

History/Social Studies: Landmarks of England. Where is England? Using the World Atlas to locate England.

Language Arts: Copy work and discussed the following words:

England, London, Europe, Queen, British Monarchy, Gables

Math: My youngest built with blocks that had two landmarks on them : Stonehenge and the London Eye. Liam used the geo-boards to create the London Eye as well as some multiplication problems.

england 001blockengland 004 luke build

england 005 eye geoboard

 

 

 

 

Art: Re-created the look of Stonehenge with rocks from around the yard and constructed Tower Bridge with Clay and Pipe Cleaners.

england 006 stonehenge

Computer: Liam loves (to say the least) the game Minecraft, each day as we finish learning about some Landmarks he is re-creating them in “his world” within the game.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Stop: Greece!

Using the books -Architecture A Visual History and 13 Buildings Children Should Know and the World Atlas we took a look at The Parthenon!

History/Social Studies: Locate Greece on the Map. Using a worksheet from the same Travel set at Education.com, he matched the Landmarks to the locations on the map of Greece; The Parthenon, Meteora, Santorini, Delphi Theater and Mount Olympus, followed by a series of True and False questions.

Language Arts: Copy work of the following words: Athens, Greece, Greek Antiquity, Columns, The Parthenon, Doric, Iconic and Corinthian.

Art: After discussing the 3 types of Columns : Doric, Iconic and Corinthian- today’s art was photography! We drove around our local towns and looked for these types of columns! Here are the photos he took:

Greece 003Greece 004Greece 005Greece 006

 

 

 

Luke did watercolor painting on printouts of the columns and Liam also designed his own Parthenon on his game minecraft :Greece 001Greece 002

Science: Optical Illusions! We viewed a video and took a closer look at the design of the columns after reading about little tricks architects use in their designs that are not immediately apparent. The end columns are slightly thicker than the others, because they are better-illuminated than the others, it makes them appear thinner!

Math: Multiplication/Division using the pillars for math word problems. Measuring with a measuring tape to see just how tall the pillars stand.

pops bridgeNow in The United States!

We began with the story Pop’s Bridge about the Golden Gate Bridge. Followed by a closer look at The Empire State Building, Statue of Liberty, The Chrysler Building and The Guggenheim Museum using the book 13 Building Children Should Know.

Language Arts: Poetry: Monumental Versus book by J. Patrick Lewis -I read the poem “Empire State Building” we then reflected on it and discussed the form of  First Person Narrative.  

The following were today’s copy work vocab/spelling words: San Francisco, Golden Gate Bridge, Empire State Building, Modernism, Spiral.

Science: We discussed the design of the Guggenheim Museum and Frank Llyod Wright’s design which is a long spiral-shaped ramp in which visitors take an elevator to the top and simply walk down.  As a repeat from Greece we also talked about optical Illusions again as the building gets progressively wider towards the top.

Math: The term “Cross-Section” as well as some Division lapbook problems.

Art: Frank Llyod Wright as well as Joseph Strauss, designer of the Golden Gate Bridge, were both persistent against critics and branched out in a new direction. With this thought, I asked Liam to design his own “cutting edge, Modern, unlike anything seen before” structure!

He designed a Robot shaped building that would be a Museum for Electronics, Video games and Robots.robot desing

Next week Visits: France, Brazil, Thailand, Spain, New Zealand!

Week Three: India, Denmark, Portugal, China and Australia!

Luke started with BFIAR today

I have looked at and read through this program: Five In A Row  so many times in the past and just love the overall concept! As of today,  Luke is starting with Before Five a Row and Liam will try Five in a Row or perhaps Beyond Five in a Row depending on the concepts and lessons (I’m not sure at this point where to start with him) I plan to add additional activities into the Unit, however I think with Liam since I feel we’ve been all over the place this year, I’ll wait and fully decide what to do by September.  For now I will take what has already been planned for this year and squeeze the two together as possible.

Anyhow, this is a Unit study program, one book read for the whole week, with corresponding lessons! This seems to be the perfect package for me! What do we do when we get new books? read them over and over!! I have always loved a Unit Themed lesson from my days as a teacher in Early Childhood and everything I’ve learned through studying the Charlotte Mason method, I’m hopeful that I’ve found that perfect cozy, practical and engaging curriculum I’ve been struggling with this year.- That I’m thrilled to try this out!!I love the CM approach but I tend to get overwhelmed with so many books in front of me trying to cover all the topics, that I feel one book with corresponding lessons will not feel so daunting and “choppy” if you will.

I signed up for a membership and was allowed access to some samples called “fold and learn”.  I am going to use these and if all goes well (with my high hopes) I will then purchase the actual products.

So for today Luke kicked off his first lesson with the Goodnight Moon fold and learn. This is one of his and my favorite books of all time. The fold and learn can easily be made into a folder or box activity after the week is through for him to go back to at anytime as will fill it this week with the activities etc.  I read him the story this morning as he practically read it along with me 🙂 (see, repetition works! ) Great Cognitive learning!  As I read the story I asked him to find the language card that corresponded with the story. I then went through each one and we practiced rhyming words like clock and sock! Like I said I will add my own ideas and activities and we just happened to have a Goodnight Moon number matching game that we did this afternoon. New ImagegmNew Imagegmm

 

 

 

 

Looks like tomorrow we’ll be working on an art activity and some science too.  I already requested the book A Pair of Red Clogs for Liam for next week from the library since I had already planned on teaching him about the Eastern Hemisphere in Geography.  This story has a fold and learn to go with it, so we’ll just add it or replace it with some things I had previously planned. I’m thinking/hoping he will enjoy this type of lessons. Units can be so fun and you can really get in depth with a subject they truly find interesting!

If anyone reads this that has previous experience with this program I’d love to hear any comments you have!