Circle the Stars

This morning we started with an alphabet rhyme from A to Z. I saw it in a movie or a show a few days ago (though I can not remember where exactly) and thought it would be a fun way to start the day.  We sat in a circle and went around alphabetically completing the phrase- goes something like this:

Allie went to Alaska with Apples-Bob went to the Bahamas with Brussel sprouts, all the way to -Zander went to Zimbabwe with Zebras!

Some letters were pretty hard! ūüôā

We then listened to an audio book about a  Dragon, a story called Dragon Rider .  Dragons must find refuge as the humans are planning to destroy their valley, on his journey he meets a boy named Ben and they become a team!

Liam then went on to finish the last two chapters in his podcast he’s been listening to. He really enjoyed it and learned a lot of science and history along the way. Luke and I worked on the “ap” family on Reading Eggs, then math in a workbook about Space, which then led to him drawing up his own constellation! -A platypus constellation named “John, the platypus.”

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This morning I set out an entire table with some hands on math activities, so they did some work with the  geo-board, fractions and multiplication activities.


We have used the Waldorf style multiplication circles before and reintroduced them to Luke who was very young the last time they were out. It is a great skip counting way to practice the multiplication facts. Liam went through each one and showed him and refreshed his memory as well. For Luke’s reference I also had the facts written out in flowers and the completed stars laid out on the table.

The boys also read a short multiplication “M” poem out of our LMNOP book and watched some birds out back for a bit, then they made their lunch and listened to an American History Story¬†about the start of the revolutionary war based on how taxes currently work in our society.

And, that wraps up our morning, I’m sure there will be some Minecraft played this afternoon as it has made a big come back in this house!

Thanks for stopping by!

 

 

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Shel Silverstein Poetry Math

I did much research this weekend on Living Math.¬† How to apply it, what exactly does it mean and how to begin transitioning over along with a million other questions I had running through my mind! I’ve done lessons here and there that I’d consider Living Math, but not as a my typical method or style.¬† I found a ton of information and I have many Living Math books on their way. So with new knowledge, ideas and some much needed inspiration-¬† we kicked it off today with some Poetry Math using two of Shel Silverstein poems! (if interested, just type in a search, found many pdf’s) Under my Living Math tab, I have listed many books and links on this subject.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I read the first poem The Googies are Coming,¬†and with the use of our change jar in front of us, we answered the follow up math questions as well as some of my own questions I had for him. He loved it! I actually heard the words “this is fun” come out of his mouth! Words that don’t usually go hand in hand with this 8yr old and math! For the last question on the sheet I grabbed the calculator and showed him how to actually add up a total using the decimal point key, and reminded him to always add it up twice before making your final answer. Normally, I would not take out the calculator for math, but I did read about introducing the different buttons on it and teaching children how to use them. He can add mentally as a rule so I thought the added calculator to the lesson would be a switch and he’d learn another little something. We proceeded on to the next poem Smart¬†and finished the follow-up math questions on this poem as well.

I also use Life of Fred for math and we did a Chapter in that book as well today. The lesson in today’s chapter was about seeing patterns in things. Such as a game of Which of these things is not like the others. Example: 7¬† 36¬†¬† 8¬†¬†¬† 1/2¬† in which you can see, could be any of them depending on your thought process!¬† He chose to say the 1/2 because it was a fraction, to which I said is correct, but it could also be 36, it’s a double digit, could be 7 it’s an odd number…and so on.

I took out a workbook for a Grammar lesson next and said there is a lot here, why don’t you just do the first column. He said “hold on” muttered to himself aloud….there’s 24 here, 12 in each row….cut that in half…that’s 6.…How about I do 6 in each column then? Absolutely! Great math buddy!